New bridge in The Gorge

Rode it again yesterday. Loved it again. Nice work!

I thought I’d share this with you all.

The big bridge at the top of the trial system was due to a replacement and with some help from the money raised at The Gorge DH and a kind donation form Michelin Jr. Bike we went to work…

Old bridge: This was built in 07 or 08 and while it was fun for many it was a bit tall and to narrow. So down it goes!

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Placing the supports for the new bridge, using local windfall or standing deadwood, pealed and cut for log sills and or log cabin supports.

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Shot of one of the cabins:

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Roughing in the frame work!

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Decking time! We used rough cut hemlock from the local mill. It’s grippy, well prices and has decent rot resistance. With some stain on there for good measure.

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And ready to ride!

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The new bridge is just under 100’ long and on average just a bit under 3’ wide. It’s fast and smooth! I’m prety happy with the results and hope every one enjoys riding and hiking it.

Cheers,

Ryan

Awesome!

You sir are a model citizen! This is beautiful. May I ask what something liket his costs to do? I’ll take “no” for an answer if you’d rather not share.

Great work! I like the ‘log cabin’ approach for stringer supports. Might try that on our trail…

And staining to boot!? Raising the stakes in trail building techique http://resource.pedaltrout.com/old_site_images/eff5a6fbfb80ca2d3ae929b0a1c15638.gif

Wow! Nice!

Original Post You sir are a model citizen! This is beautiful. May I ask what something liket his costs to do? I’ll take “no” for an answer if you’d rather not share.
Well… The lumber bill was around $600, We used to cans of stain (lucked out and got some “miss tint” cans for cheep so that was $40, Spent another $ 40 on spikes and I had the nails for the decking left over from another project, fuel for the saw and a few other misc. expenses and your about $700 in materials.

The AVMBA had a pretty tight budget on this project, a little over $1000, so it won’t cover all the time we put into it, no where near really, but it’s going in our portfolio and its for a good cause so I’ll suck up the loss this time.

Great work! I like the ‘log cabin’ approach for stringer supports. Might try that on our trail…

And staining to boot!? Raising the stakes in trail building techique http://resource.pedaltrout.com/old_site_images/eff5a6fbfb80ca2d3ae929b0a1c15638.gif

Thanks!

I like using the cribs (or cabins) on sections like this. This area soft and a bit moist most of the year so post style supports would sink and start to wobble around over time.

Using the wide log sills and cabins gives more surface area keeping the structure stable while still allowing the bridge to “float” a bit vertically as the ground moves. Vertical posts would result in side to side wobble in this situation and that is less then desirable.

Thanks for the disclosure. It seems you were pretty smart about gathering materials. The hemlock was impressive as is the build quality. Stunning stuff.

Have you tried pounding posts into the ground on wet sections like this? I wasn’t sure if that’s what you meant by vertical supports or just vertical posts set on the ground.

We’ve got a couple of areas that I was planning to do the ‘fence post’ method to traverse them… I would be most interested in your experience with this method.

My experience is that in chronically damp areas the if you use vertical posts to support the bridge eventually that will start to punch down a bit, not if all the posts would move in the same amount at the same time it would not be a big deal but you typically get them moving at different depths and times so some sections get wobbler then others.

If you can get the posts sunk deep enough that they are on firm solid ground then you ‘should’ be fine. Many marshy areas
have just too deep of an organic layer over the soil to dig down to solid soil or rock. So using wide sills flat on the ground (dug down to sit on something at least semi solid if you can) becomes your most viable option.

Example: Put this bog bridge in early this spring. The locaion is mushy year round so we use wide flat log sills to distrubate the weight of the bridge and allow it to float a bit when things get really wet. Sinking vertical posts here would have , well sucked and create a bridge that would have been tippy side to side. Much rather have a little bit of vertical play in the structure then having it tip over.

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Now that all being said… avoid these types of areas when ever possiable. The above bog bridge would never had been needed if the orginial trail builder had moved 20 feet to the left.

Thanks for the disclosure. It seems you were pretty smart about gathering materials. The hemlock was impressive as is the build quality. Stunning stuff.
Thanks Jeff,

Yeah we did as much with site materials as was resonable for this project. The responce from the riding public has been very possitive so far :slight_smile:

Rode it today. Loved it!