CO2 vs Mini Bike Pump | Which is better?


#1

I was actually expecting more from the CO2.


#2

Not the best testing protocol. Used the smallest co2 size one can get and didn’t see how many it would take to inflate. Sad. I think there are fat bike sized co2 canisters out there, but since I don’t give a damn about fat bikes, I won’t be looking it up.

Edit: Tried to make myself look like less of an asshole by editing my use of words.


#3

Good on ya.


#4

I carry both. Depending on the distance, multiple tubes and a patch kit.


#5

I bring a large Co2 with a plug kit and fresh sealant in tires.
Its crazy how fast stans sealant dries up in warmer weather.


#6

But when you think about it, the comparison makes sense as he was comparing the smallest pump you can get to a co2. The difference between my ultra mini pump and my ‘MTB specific’ is night and day.


#7

Maybe comparing using a shock pump to pump a fat tire to the 16oz CO2 would make more sense.


#8

shrug if you insist.


#9

CO2 is a waste of time, just get a good pump, they never run out and don’t create any garbage. Never had any issues using a small pump with tubes or tubeless…
I still have a Blackburn Mammoth mini pump from the 90’s that pumps a decent volume in a reasonable amount of time and isn’t very big. Replaced the o rings in it a couple of times with readily available plumbing parts.

Portable pumps are even better these days, I have a Crank Brothers one that works great and switches between high volume and high pressure. Lezyne also makes some nice ones.


#10

Ignoring your waste of time comment for the moment, but how much waste does a small aluminum cylinder contribute to the garbage pile? Like seriously? You might want to talk to the airsoft people out there.


#11

Considering that I only use one when I flat on the trail, and then only when nobody else has a pump, I don’t think I create much garbage with one, and it allows me to travel light without a backpack of any sort.


#12

A pump lasts multiple flats, is more reliable and you can get whatever pressure you want, CO2 is use once, pressure is limited by the volume of the cartridge and then it is thrown away…

The garbage thing is a side note really I can’t believe you’d bother to harp on it but it’s just another drop in our disposable culture bucket, no one ever thinks their little bit of garbage contributes. It still creates more garbage than a pump in the long run. I’ve never felt burdened by carrying one, in a pack or frame mounted.


#13

Like I said I carry both. For road bikes it is a necessity but for MTB it is more of a convenience thing when getting attacked by black flies, normally I’d just use the pump (xc racing being the exception of course) . I don’t understand how saying I’m not going to comment on something constitutes harping on it, ha ha.


#14

I like the simplicity and reliability of a pump.

Weight is not a concern for me though.

The wastefulness of buying and tossing cylinders irks me a wee bit too.


#15

Anyone else hear that some sealants are not compatible with CO2?


#16

I also carry a pump. Small enough to tuck in my hydration pack and pretty much infinitely reuseable… Works for me.


#17

I’m a pump guy myself, but I wonder about alternatives for those that worry about waste:

Presumably you could have larger refillable tank at home.

https://www.sks-germany.com/en/products/rideair/

Heavy/likely directed at the e-mtb crowd-but maybe size and bulk would come down with a little R&D?

https://deltacycle.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=9&search=Horn

I bet someone smarter than me could strip all the Heavy noise making bits off and rig a pump head to this. You’d have a relatively lightweight-home pump refillable bottle that could fit in a bottle cage. Looks like it holds 80 psi.


#18

We all prefer pumps, but they just don’t fit every single scenario.


#19

I have recently heard of CO2 impacting sealant . . . yet others say it does not.


#20

Interesting.