STATE OF EMERGENCY - where to ride

I think this would be a good time to compile where we can still ride, moving forward assuming that most places we were familiar with are now off limits.

  • streets
  • sidewalks (since there shouldn’t be many pedestrians!)
  • your backyard
  • your cul de sac
  • logging roads

Feel free to add to the list

Wanted to edit this to add;
obviously everyone should be responsible, avoid congregating at trailheads, be cautious and vigilant; do not park your car near areas where others could gather, as much as it sucks we should all try to stay within our neighbourhoods, find areas you can reach via bicycle to avoid the risk of parking at trailheads and near others, preventing congregations altogether. The better we do this now, the sooner it will be over.
Most trails suck now anyways, keep telling yourself they are nothing but muck and stay safe, stay home.
There are already several reported and confirmed instances of people returning from away and not isolating, so treat everything and everyone as a possible transmission source.

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Whooper!

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Whopper - a lot of lake loop/Suzie Q is inside the provincial wilderness protection area so technically off limits.

Whopper - flipside, death march, dominion, scotch and the power lines are open.

Evil Birch - open when the quarry is not operating.

Bowater - I believe it’s on crown land, but it’s not a provincial park so maybe ok?

Having said all that, the state of emergency directs you to stay in your neighbourhood. You shouldn’t be travelling by car to go for a ride.

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Indoor trainer…LOL

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I would think everything on the left side of the doubletrack at Spider would be good to ride. This would include Replicator, Six Pack, Lego, Hurricane. My Humps and Spintastic. Not sure about the Old Poker Run/MIssissippi. You could also ride the pipeline that parallels the highway all the way to Miller Lake. You could cross the highway through the pipe and ride on the other side. We call that Honey Jar

It’s not the same as ripping up Fight but there are pedal cranks to be had

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Provincial Wilderness Areas are not parks. So Technically they would be open to use for activities not involving mountain bikes. Or did that change?

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Oooh time for Wrandees to get some love.

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:pray:

If there is a god!

Regarding Spider here is the word quoted directly from an email from Tony Mancini…

Spider Lake trails that are on Halifax Water land are closed. The part of the trail system that belongs to NS Power and Brightwood Golf Club is private so it is up to those organizations to make a decision regarding opening or closing.

So basically if it is not on Trailforks you can consider it closed. https://www.trailforks.com/region/spider-lake/

Much of Wrandees is within Long Lake Provincial Park boundaries, so those trails are closed.

https://novascotia.ca/natr/parks/management/pdf-longlake/location.pdf

I think we should just bite the bullet and honestly just not go anywheres where there’s a noticeable and known trailhead or where cars can park, so this can be over faster. It’s going to suck. A lot. But if you can’t get there via bike or a discrete entrance I say we just lay low

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Park Reserve. I’m not even sure if the new stuff falls under the parks act wrt park vs park reserve. The parking lot on smbr is on municipal land but the park is provincial. Splitting hairs, I concede but the legislation does distinguish between provincial parks and park reserves.

I agree it is splitting hairs but if people are trying to split hairs to get around the directions of all the public health officials then so be it…

The management plan definitely differentiates between a “park” and a “park reserve” when it talks about different Provincial properties in the area. “Long Lake Provincial Park” is how it is always stated, unlike “Herring Cove Provincial Park Reserve” or “West Dover Provincial Park Reserve”

https://novascotia.ca/natr/parks/management/pdf-longlake/dpma1208.pdf
Page 2…

In 1981, the2,095 hectare (5,177 acre) former Halifax Watershed property was acquired by the Province and assigned to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for management as a provincial park. Long Lake Provincial Park was subsequently designated under the Provincial Parks Act in 1984.


Kings county: Rail trails are a go, please use responsibly and do not crowd or drive to trailheads

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That’s a Draft Management Plan. I should know, I spent about ten years or so working on it. As far as I know it is still a draft, so offically Long Lake would fall under the all encompassing Parks Act and is officially recognized as Park Reserve of which different regulations apply. Its been some time since I have read it but I’m sure you can find it somewhere.

Though I don’t doubt that they mean all parkland when they say provincial parks. Play safe, everyone,

I really don’t give a fuck to bother digging, all the maps and documents readily available do not use “Park Reserve” for Long Lake.

My point is more that some people seem to think they are in some way smart for finding a loophole which they determine makes them exempt from what is currently happening here and those people are idiots.

If people need such an excuse to assure themselves that public orders do not apply to them then I guess this is just as good as any other.

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Not looking for a loophole, just discussing facts and the fact is that Long Lake Provincial Park is designated as Park Reserve under the Provincial Parks Act of Nova Scotia.

I hope that common sense will prevail and people will stay home, but from the news I’m seeing coming from the city that is wishful thinking.

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